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Thread: These three pictures make a powerful statement about race and power among women

  1. #11
    Moderator purplekitty's Avatar
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    I think the only picture that actually makes a powerful statement is the second picture. (WOG, the third picture is at the link.)

    I don't know of any place that has $5-$8 manicures!

  2. #12
    Moderator Shaena's Avatar
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    I have never see n an 8 dollar manicure either, everywhere charges 25 and up, including the hair salons and spas.

  3. #13
    Non-praying member Mamapalooza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erin View Post
    Remind me...why again am I guilty for getting my nails done at a nail salon that is owned/run by a Viatnamese couple? Where they hire 100% Viatnamese employeesand I pay the service price that they request and then tip 20% on top?

    Is it inherently racist for me to frequent this nail salon? Or is it racist if I don't, because...well, racism.
    Ya, the first set of pictures does nothing for me either.


    The second one tells a better story because that would not happen in our world where whites are still the majority. In a different culture, sure.

    The third one in the link shows a white maid being ignored by her black employee who is on the phone. Not doing much for me with that one either, because it's not out of the realm of possibilities.

    I don't think these images give the "powerful statement" they think they do.
    "Wherever in the world much poverty is found, much religion is found also"

  4. #14
    Full Sponsor Erin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamapalooza View Post
    Y
    I don't think these images give the "powerful statement" they think they do.
    Totally agree. Anyone can call anything art. But eh...these are a little too...cliche for me.

  5. #15
    Premier Sponsor Peanut's Avatar
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    The picture of the little girl looking at the dolls is the one that had the intended effect on me. The other two? Not so much. The one not shared here but at the link just reminded me of the scene in "Forrest Gump" where Bubba's mom was being served by the white cook/maid after serving whites for so many years.

    The doll issue is a very concrete example, however. Over 40% of "my town" is non-caucasian, with a high percentage of that 40+% below poverty level. As a caucasian woman wanting to donate population-reflective dolls to local charitable toy drives, I discovered my only option was to order them online. Last year, my dds and I spent a couple of days going to most of the stores in this town that sell toys, and couldn't find a single African American baby doll. (We found a couple of dolls that appeared possibly latina.)

    It was an unintentional sociological experiment that truly had an effect on us.

  6. #16
    Being it, y'all! Lizzie Beth's Avatar
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    These three pictures make a powerful statement about race and power among women

    I live in the heart of the $8 manicure. Probably 80% of the women in my town get their nails done on a regular basis, regardless of social status. Here it's Korean, not Vietnamese, I'm not sure that it matters. Competition is cutthroat and people have high expectations for what are to me, bargain prices.

    And you should see some of the local FB group posts. "I'm a loyal customer and I was 15 minutes late, but I called and told them and they STILL took another customer ahead of me and made me wait!$!@! Won't ever go there again and you shouldn't either!" At least on that one, I wasn't the only person saying "you were late, these places have to make money, it wasn't personal."

    The women who have spent their lives here don't seem to realize how low the price is compared with the rest of the country. And what a precarious position these nail techs can be in, depending on the salon owner. I tip generously in cash and try to be as discreet as possible about it - by law they don't have to share tips and it has to be posted in their language, but as a practical matter the owners are often providing their housing, transportation, etc., and they're the ones who speak English while the techs often only have a little. And I've seen some customers be so exasperated with the language. And I want to say "you do realize that's part and parcel of your mani/pedi that costs less than a trip to Wendy's, right? And this 'lady who doesn't know English' has to touch your eagle talon-like feet!"

    I'm usually non confrontational in public, but I really enjoy being openly judgey at the haughtiness sometimes, either with my tech or with other customers. I wouldn't say I never pull out Google translate so I can do it in Korean.. . I wish I knew what would help either than a big tip and social pressure on the rude customers. Not going, probably, but that's not going to change the industry here.

  7. #17
    Non-praying member Mamapalooza's Avatar
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    We have a couple of Asian-run nail salons, but the majority are pretty white around here. I thought it was more of a mythical stereotype than reality. Huh.
    "Wherever in the world much poverty is found, much religion is found also"

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