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Thread: What should be the role of health coverage in our society?

  1. #1
    Shrieking Violet Sprockey's Avatar
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    What should be the role of health coverage in our society?

    What is the Purpose of Obamacare, Ryancare, Trumpcare et al.?


    Republican proponents of the Americans Health Care Act are navigating a minefield with attacks from both the left and right. A CBO report claims 24 million people could lose coverage over 10 years, while a complete ACA repeal would only cause something like 23 million to drop out. The difference of opinion has to do with where you stand on the goal of health reform and the purpose of health coverage.

    How much should a healthy personís health insurance premiums reflect the cost of another personís poor health status? Stated another way, how much should society invest in care for the sickest individuals? Moreover, should society invest in primary care or inpatient care?

    This is a bigger question than most people realize. Currently, 20 percent of the U.S. population accounts for 80 percent of all medical spending. It gets worse: the sickest 10 percent account for two-thirds of medical spending; 5 percent accounts for half of spending while the sickest 1 percent accounts for nearly one-quarter. In other words, if you want your premiums to fall by two-thirds just kick the least healthy 10 percent off your health plan. By contrast, the healthiest 50 percent of the population has few if any medical bills during a given year. You want them in your health plan.

    What should be the role of health coverage in our society? Some believe health coverage should function as insurance to manage unforeseen health risks. If youíre old and sick, you pay more; if youíre young and healthy, you pay less. Others believe the healthy and sick should all pay the same (high) premium so sick people get medical care at a bargain. Sometimes this is done through socialized national health systems, like those found in Britain and Canada. National health systems use a hefty dose of progressive taxation to fund health care. Obamacare was an attempt to achieve some of the goals of socialized medicine but through private insurance.
    Obamacare took us farther in the direction of the sky is the limit. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) banned both annual and lifetime caps on benefits, which removed any limits on what the sickest patients could demand from their fellow Americans. Specialty drugs that cost $1,500 per month and orphan drugs that run $160,000 per year are both examples of extremely costly medicine.
    The ACA is failing because it allows anyone to sign up for coverage regardless of health status. Yet enrollees with poor health pay the same premiums as healthier people. This means healthy people have to pay far more than they would otherwise pay if premiums were based on their expected health risk alone. Healthy folks donít generally like paying premiums that are the size of car payments when they only anticipate seeing a doctor once during the year. Thatís why thereís an individual mandate. Without a mandate, healthy folks would drop coverage, destabilizing the insurance pool. Premiums would rise for all who remain until a fresh round of semi-healthy dropouts drove premiums even higher.



    The problems facing bargain basement socialized medicine and sky is the limit Obamacare is that with either of these two extremes people arenít allowed to make any choices about their preferences. Rather, preferences were made for people at a cost of hundreds per month. The sooner we realize that the better we will be financially.










  2. #2
    Real Americanô nam's Avatar
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    The cheapest way to cover everyone is single payer. You eliminate the middle man, and a lot of the profit motive and save costs. No one has ever demonstrated why giving insurance companies 20% of medical dollars does anything good for healthcare in America. And the next question is why give a huge chunk of our medical dollars to the bottom line of our for-profit hospitals?
    If you are not willing to fall flat on your face, then the only thing you will have is a pretty face.

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    Premier Sponsor Jasmine's Avatar
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    I have said in the past and adamantly say again, the root problem of health care in this nation is that it is a "for profit" industry and not a taxpayer paid service. Virtually every other civilized first world nation on this planet considers health care to be a human right. We have to decide whether or not we want to be Athens or Sparta where they literally disposed of the deformed and the infirm.

    The greatness of a nation is measured by how it treats its people, not by how big a military it has. That is obviously a concept with which "The Donald" and his minions are completely unfamiliar. We need a bigger military about as much as Angelina Jolie needs another kid.
    "Life is about dreams. Teaching is about making them come true."

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    kcunaC yzarC Lor's Avatar
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    Not surprisingly I believe in the single pay non-profit medicare system, I'm perfectly happy to pay a portion of my taxes for my entire working life to know that people are not dying of treatable illnesses because they don't have the money or coverage to get the treatment they require to survive.

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    The OP appears not to recognize that healthy people will at some point be unhealthy.

  6. #6
    I flunked typing coachgrrl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nam View Post
    The cheapest way to cover everyone is single payer. You eliminate the middle man, and a lot of the profit motive and save costs. No one has ever demonstrated why giving insurance companies 20% of medical dollars does anything good for healthcare in America. And the next question is why give a huge chunk of our medical dollars to the bottom line of our for-profit hospitals?


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