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Thread: S/O Dog Rescues

  1. #1
    Heartless Wench Alice Chalmers's Avatar
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    S/O Dog Rescues

    As I mentioned in the daily thread, we want to get a puppy. Our ideal is a mixed breed that is part collie, part something else. Our dog would be a very loved farm and house companion.

    So we're looking at PetFinder and coming across puppies that have been brought up here from Alabama. The rescue that has them has a very elaborate application process, the site has admonishments about how if you can't afford the adoption fee of $500 then you shouldn't have an animal, and so on and so forth. This particular rescue's website states that in 2016 it had over $550,000 in vet bills.

    What. The. Fuck.

    I mean hey, people can do what they want, but over half a million dollars in vet bills? For real? This does not seem to be an enormous rescue program. What in the world are they doing? Well, I can answer that: part of their "we need help" page is asking for money for the care of an elderly dog that has cancer that can't be treated with chemo.

    Personally, I have zero interest in going through a complex application and a home visit and paying an enormous fee for a mixed-breed puppy.

    What about you? Do rescues go to far? Is there a great sin in getting a puppy from a county shelter or a neighbor whose dog had a tawdry affair with the neighborhood stray? How much would you pay, and to what extent would you go, to get a dog?

  2. #2
    Let's take a trip to the stars Steffy's Avatar
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    Rescues are ridiculous. It should not be *that* hard to adopt an animal. Our local shelters have a reasonable process. So reasonable, we've gotten 4 cats and a dog from them over the years. *sigh* lol

    I'm not fond of supporting puppy mills, but if a neighbor had a puppy, I see nothing wrong with that.

    Heyyy if you want a part collie, I've got a border collie/blue heeler/PITA that would love to live on a farm! J/K Mostly.

  3. #3
    Heartless Wench Alice Chalmers's Avatar
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    What I find particularly amusing is that rescue folks tend to complain bitterly that "no one" wants to help these animals, as if anyone who balks at their requirements is an animal hater or something. Hey, if they want to have such high requirements that they end up "fostering" animals for years upon years, go for it. But I'll pass on that whole process. Our county shelter does a damn good job, IMO.

  4. #4
    Moderator purplekitty's Avatar
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    Some rescues are out of control, for sure. And I think there are animals that rescues keep alive that should be euthanized, like that elderly dog with cancer. Seriously? Why are they spending limited resources on that dog when there are so many animals out there that need help? It's nonsensical.

    In any event, we adopted Sasha from a rescue seven years ago and her fee was $400. She is the PERFECT fit for our family. I'd do it again. But I've also adopted many animals from our local shelter that is considerably less. It's all about what's available when I'm looking for a new furkid.

  5. #5
    Chronically sleep deprived RN_mom's Avatar
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    Yeah I have an issue with a lot of rescues. It's great that they are rescuing dogs from high kills shelters or bad situations. But at the same time, there is such a thing as doing too much. The fully blind elderly dog with diabetes may be sweet as can be, but you're not likely to get them adopted and they take up limited resources. Use that money to help a relatively young dog with a non-chronic condition that has a hope of being adopted.

    I get helping animals. All but one of our animals have been rescues. At the same time, there isn't exactly (unfortunately) a shortage on dogs needing good homes.

  6. #6
    Premier Sponsor Peanut's Avatar
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    For a rescue, that seems outrageously high. Something is definitely off. Some sort of fee is one thing, but that seems way higher than it should be to me.

    Not all rescue groups are ridiculous. Although my story doesn't entail dogs, I'll share how it worked for us. We have two rescue Siamese cats. My family has always loved the breed, but not to the extent of paying an inordinate sum of money for a house pet and companion. After doing a lot of research (to include meeting with some rather peculiar breeders), we decided to go through a Siamese rescue organization instead of a breeder. Many of the cats this organization adopts out are older cats, have chronic health conditions, or the result of "tawdry affairs" with the neighborhood stray. The older cats are frequently ones that were turned in to shelters when the owners have passed away, or when the vet bills became unbearable. These cats are usually adopted "on scholarship", which basically means you pay no fees, and simply love the cat and provide it a warm home in which to die peacefully. In cases like this, it's a good idea (imho) to make sure people are aware of what they are getting into before they adopt. We did have to go through an interview process with them, and were assigned a volunteer caseworker to help make sure we were paired with a cat that would suit our household.

    There are volunteers within the network who notify the rescue organization when a Siamese or Siamese mix is turned into a shelter. These cats are fostered out or brought to the actual rescue centers and provided health care as needed. The veterinarians provide the care pro bono or for seriously reduced fees for the organization.

    When possible, you are provided as much of a cat's "story" as is known. Our female came to them as a result of an owner developing an allergy (medically documented) following the birth of a child. The allergy family adopted her from the rescue. The rescue "received" her from a shelter when her owner moved out of her parents' house and parents didn't want to keep the cat (they also declawed her on all four paws ). We are her third home, with shelter stays and plenty of change in her short life. We adopted our male a couple of months after incorporating her into our home. He was the result of a tawdry affair between his lovely Siamese mother--who most likely got outside when she was in heat-- and an unknown stray, and was found in a parking lot with his mother and brother--both kittens just teeny tiny at the time.

    Our "kids" came fully vetted and vaccinated--with health records; spayed/neutered; with a bag of toys and some of their food, and with a health certificate so they could be transported across state lines if needed (ours needed the certificate). We paid something like $150 for the adoption of each of them (including a new carrier provided by the Rescue); and met a volunteer driver halfway between the rescue and our home (2 hours for each of us, with a total of 4 hours ride time for the cats).

  7. #7
    Heartless Wench Alice Chalmers's Avatar
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    $150 sounds very reasonable! If we get that puppy, it would be $250 including neutering, vaccinations, and microchip. A good bargain and a good cause, I think.

    Some rescues are fantastic. Other ones simply aren't doing the animals any favors.

  8. #8
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    $150 so the cats can all be spayed/neutered before they are adopted out seems quite reasonable. $500 because you want to make money off the adoptions so you can provide surgery to an elderly dog with cancer who has no idea why he is being put through all the pain of surgery, chemo, radiation, etc. is crazy. To be honest, I also don't think it is all that kind to the elderly ill dog.
    "You can bomb the world to pieces, but you can't bomb it into peace."



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  9. #9
    Shrieking Violet Sprockey's Avatar
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    We got Triscuit from a rescue and her fee was $400.
    She had all of her shots, was spayed, and micro-chipped.

    So I don't think her fee was unreasonable at all.

  10. #10
    Wishes reality was like comic books tpatt100's Avatar
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    I think our cats were only 100 a piece our greyhounds were 300 each. The greyhounds required home visit
    Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don't recognize them.


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