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Thread: S/O Dog Rescues

  1. #11
    Premier Sponsor Peanut's Avatar
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    Sorry--I had a cat hop up into my lap and fall asleep on my arm and chest and couldn't move to edit my post in time. Our rescued kitties are also chipped, just in case they ever got outside.

  2. #12
    Moderator Shaena's Avatar
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    I think it comes down to, if the dog is "The One" and also, if you like the shelter you are contributing to. My sister Foster's dogs for a rescue. She fostered a dog, that they found shot in the woods down in Georgia. They paid for his surgery to remove the bullet, and then found an unrelated cardiac issue. His cardiac issue is inoperable, does not require much in vet care anymore but did make him hard to adopt- he could live for another 15 years or die tomorrow. It was very difficult finding him a permeant home. Her current foster is deaf, and is going through training to make him adoptable. The fees to adopt from them are $300, which is reasonable. They do a lot of fundraising, as well. Her first foster, got returned when the ding dong who adopted him, decided that the dog was unreasonable for being wild when he let him out of his crate daily after leaving him in it for 12 hours a day while he was working.

    I have two rescues, one I got from another shelter for $250. She was from a kill shelter down south. And my second, from the groomer my daughter volunteered for, another puppy surrendered for doing what puppies do, when you leave them alone all day. I reimbursed the groomer their vet costs.

    As an aside the first year I had my first rescue dog, she suffered an autoimmune disease that cost us 3000.00 to cure. She is worth every penny! I love her madly.

  3. #13
    Full Sponsor Fanny's Avatar
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    The rescues around here ask at least that much, sometimes more. Our humane society/city shelter is pretty pricey too. I know a lot of people used to wait until they halved their prices before going in to adopt. With the advent of microchipping and tattooing though, the humane society here doesn't usually have an influx of dogs anymore, so it's rare that they are overcrowded with dogs. Cats, yes, but dogs don't seem to last very long before being adopted, so I guess the fee isn't an issue for whomever adopts those dogs.

    They have to couch it as a rehoming fee or whatever due to some particular legislation on the books here. They're supposed to be not for profit but it sure doesn't come across that way. We've volunteered for rescues, as foster homes, but we have either got our animals from a breeder (and we are the evil awful scum of the earth for that, but whatthefuckever), or we've taken in animals that people were giving away. 2 of our 3 dogs came from a private home that wasn't able to keep them any longer, and they gave us all their stuff, we didn't pay a dime. I know that the rescues we fostered for, we didn't even have to supply food for the dogs; the rescue provided everything, and if there was a medical issue, they took care of that as well.

    I am an animal lover. I'd have a hobby farm packed full of all kinds of critters, if I had the money to buy the land I'd need. But, I am one of the bad people, who doesn't believe in extreme measures to save an animal, if the outcome is only going to end in death regardless. We euthanized one of our dogs rather than pay thousands and thousands for a back surgery that couldn't guarantee the same thing wouldn't just happen again. If there was some sort of really good percentage of an outcome for the surgery, we might have considered it, but it was less than 50%. We simply couldn't afford to go to a completely different province and pay the thousands of dollars, for a surgery that didn't have a great assurance. But like I said, I'm considered bad because I'll go to a reputable breeder to pay for one of their dogs and because I won't donate funds toward an animal who is going to die anyway, regardless of the interventions. I don't think it does the animal any favours, and I don't think it helps the community either.

  4. #14
    I'm just here for the lulz. Sarsparilla's Avatar
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    Private breed rescue people can be nuts. There's a pug rescue in Santa Fe who won't rehome a dog with us because we both work. We don't even try with them anymore and actively steer people away from supporting them.

    Sebastian and Dozer both came from a private breed rescue in Albuquerque. In fact, there's not a good pug rescue in Albuquerque, so the excellent Boston rescue paid his eye surgery fees! We gave $300 to NMBTR for Dozer, which was the out of pocket cost for his "surrender" from his asshole family of origin in Las Cruces. That cost was paid by the unofficial pug rescue lady, who asked that we donate the amount to NMBTR. We also give a decent amount to NMBTR every month. I can't remember what we paid NMBTR for Sebastian. He was pulled from the Albuquerque pound by one of NMBTR's volunteers who looks at all the shelters for Bostons every week. I know the rescue must have paid plenty for his initial eye testing, diagnosis, and medications. His eyes used to give him terrible pain every minute of every day.

    Anecdata aside, and assuming you're not purchasing puppy mill puppies, any time you give a dog who is unhomed a good home, you're rescuing a dog. Whether it's through the city, the county, a neighbor with a wily slut, or whatever.

    We bought Tank from a breeder and I would do it again. He was being retired from stud and we had him neutered. His life with us was short, but it was blissful. My mother got their Blitzer dog from a Bichon rescue om OKC that rescued him from a puppy mill. So technically he was a puppy mill dog. They didn't want to adopt to NM until my parents offered to come pick him up!

    Ignore the crazy people. There are lots of ethical ways to rescue animals to be part of your furever family.
    Welcome to Fluffytown. No smoking, no farting, no pillow fights.

  5. #15
    Moderator Shaena's Avatar
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    Oh gosh yes! My sister shares her rescue drama stories all the time with me, she says quite a few of the women involved are absolutely nuts over competing as the most "selfless" volunteer!

  6. #16
    argh Nansel's Avatar
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    I only really learned much about dog rescues when I started working in animal world, 5 years ago. And boy, as a lifetime pet owner and animal lover, that has been quite the education. I know it's generalizing and anecdote, but the vast majority of people I know who are heavily involved in rescue are a wee bit on the unbalanced side. They tend to be obsessive about the topic, and super duper opinionated, and not afraid to fight publicly with people who have differing opinions.

    Here just last week there was a shitstorm between rescues when a woman went public with her story - that a rescue misrepresented themselves to her when she was trying to find a new home for her dog that wasn't getting along with the other dogs in the house. They took the dog for free and put her up for "sale" the same day online. I say sale, because the dog was spayed and up to date on shots, and the rescue didn't even take her to the vet, just instantly put her up for a $375 adoption. The owner saw her dog online and tried to get her back, but the rescue said she'd have to pay them. In the media the head of the rescue said they didn't care about people and that this dog was better off elsewhere.

    Cue the howls of rage from other rescues online and in the media. It got ugly and personal.

    Another rescue here, a breed specific one, takes females from backyard breeders when the breeders have worn them out. And adopts them as "rescues". No, fuckheads, you are an outlet for shitty backyard breeders to dump their older dogs without feeling guilty about it, and giving them more space to wear out another poor mama dog. When I framed it like that to someone I met who was involved, she looked like a deer caught in headlights. She said she'd never thought of it that way and would have to think about it some more.

    Just like the rescues on the west coast I knew about that would fly down to the US and Mexico and get super popular and easy to sell chihuahuas and chi mixes to sell in Canada. That crosses the line from rescue into brokering, I personally think.

    Thanks to travelling rescues, heartworm is now a thing in my city. It didn't used to be, until people imported dogs from the southern US, especially after Katrina, and didn't take care of them properly. Now I have to pay for tests and dose my dog for a disease that shouldn't even be here. It's not like we have a shortage of stray dogs here, there are huge numbers running around on reserves that get culled every once in a while. Not pretty.

    Now, all the pets I've had as an adult came from shelters except for our cat Bo, who is from a rescue. I'd never go to a rescue now, for a dog at least. The cat people seem a bit nutty but good hearted.

    We'd likely never qualify for a dog from a rescue here anyway - the fence on the side of our yard is only 3' tall. Plus I've never crate trained a dog, which is considered the only way to do things. Funny, because the shelter in BC where we got Holly from was actually opposed to crating, and wouldn't adopt a dog to you if you said you were going to crate them all day. I'm all about balance, and as long as your dog isn't going to be in a crate for 16 hours a day (sadly, all too common), I think they're a wonderful thing. We've just never had a dog that seemed to want one.

    There are worse things in the world than being euthanized. I've taken part in many of them. It's sad, but not as sad as what some animals suffer their entire short lives. And don't get me started on rescues that use the photos of damaged animals to raise money....

  7. #17
    Let's take a trip to the stars Steffy's Avatar
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    Someone on my FB was just denied a dog from a rescue, because she said she's used a crate before, and would have one open for the dog to use if it wanted to. :crazy

    I think Lucy was $300 from the shelter. She had to stay on meds in isolation for a week to make sure her kennel cough wasn't contagious any longer. She was already fixed, not sure if she was already chipped. Then, she tore her ACL the day we brought her home and had to have nearly $1,500 worth of surgery and vet care.

    Cats were around $100, I think, and they came fixed and chipped.

    Henry was free. But, I've spent several hundred on training for him, and he needs some more. I'm just tired of trying to find a good one. The one that came highly recommended wanted to shock the shit out of him every time he barked at a dog until he stopped barking. It didn't help.

  8. #18
    argh Nansel's Avatar
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    Crating is a hot topic in doggy world, for sure!

    One thing I meant to mention in my post earlier is that there's a world of difference between shelters and rescues. It seems they get talked about in one breath a lot. The SPCA, Humane Society type place is where I'd go if I was looking for a "used" dog. Not a rescue.

  9. #19
    I flunked typing coachgrrl's Avatar
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    500.00 is a lot.

    We've adopted our collie from a home breeder on a farm (we went to the farm and picked lily out of the litter) in backwoods Maine - she was 350.00. Gus we got from North Texas Boston Terrier rescue- I filled out one form, got a reference from our vet and he came to visit to see if he and lily got along. Then it was 300.00 -he was fully vaccinated/chipped/crate trained and had his own crate, which he loves.

    Lily was never crate trained.

  10. #20
    Full Sponsor maurinsky's Avatar
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    I know someone who was rejected from adopting a cat because of the type of cat litter he planned to use. He and his wife were able to adopt a child, but were rejected by the cat rescue people.

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