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Thread: Acetone on a table. Help!

  1. #1
    orange-be-gone MLA's Avatar
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    Acetone on a table. Help!

    Help! I spilled pure acetone on my kitchen table. I got it off before it got to the stain, but you can see where it was because it ate through the finish (I'm assuming lacquer). I've been scouring the internet for ways to fix this, but before I actually do anything, I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience with this. Any advice?

    Here's what I've found. Think it would work?

    Lacquer

    You might not be able to see that the lacquer has been compromised, but if you sight down the damaged area, you'll see that the damaged area has a dull look, or a slight depression where the acetone dissolved the lacquer. If you've finished using the stain marker and are happy with the results, move on to the lacquer repair. Most modern wood products are finished with lacquer, but if you can't tell what the finish is made from, it's OK to use lacquer to repair it with. Place masking tape around the damaged area if it's a spot less than about 1/2-inch in diameter. If it's bigger than that, don't use the tape. Spray the damaged area with a light coat of aerosol lacquer from a can. When the lacquer dries, sand it lightly with steel wool and spray it again. If you can still see a slight depression, spray it two or three more times.

    Burnish

    Burnishing is a technique used to blend and flatten lacquers or almost any type of clear finish. Once you've used the stain marker and applied lacquer to the damaged area, fold a piece of denim into a small square. Use it like sandpaper to sand over the sprayed area. Use it with authority, rubbing the denim over the area with enough force to heat the surface of the lacquer by friction. Continue on in this manner until the lacquer blends together, hiding any areas where the fresh lacquer meets the older finish. If the damage is on the arm of a chair, burnish the whole arm. If the repaired area is on a tabletop, burnish the tabletop completely, but focus on the damaged area, using lighter pressure around the perimeter of the damage until the repaired area cannot be seen.

  2. #2
    Full Sponsor GiftOfFlavor's Avatar
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    I threw away a coffee table once in a horrible nail-polish removing accident. I got nothing

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    3:21:44 Peachy's Avatar
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    Full Sponsor TapToTalk's Avatar
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    I definitely have experience with it. It did not end well. But, it was an inexpensive night table in DD1's room.

    I saw this one when I was looking for information about how professionals repair wood tables with damage.


  5. #5
    orange-be-gone MLA's Avatar
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    Yeah, TTT, I saw that one, too. It works well for heat damage, but I tried it, and nothing for acetone damage. :/

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    Premier Sponsor Mare's Avatar
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    I would say that's your best bet, MLA (what you posted). If the finish is eaten off, there's nothing you can do to restore it besides refinish the whole thing or try what you posted. It may not match exactly, but it should look better than it does now.

    I ruined our coffee table when I was a kid. My mom was not happy.

    I also have a spot on my nightstand where body oil of all things took a bit of the finish off. It ate right through to the wood.

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    Moderator purplekitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peachy View Post


    Sorry, MLA. I got nothing. I just wanted to laugh at this.

  8. #8
    orange-be-gone MLA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mare View Post
    I would say that's your best bet, MLA (what you posted). If the finish is eaten off, there's nothing you can do to restore it besides refinish the whole thing or try what you posted. It may not match exactly, but it should look better than it does now.

    I ruined our coffee table when I was a kid. My mom was not happy.

    I also have a spot on my nightstand where body oil of all things took a bit of the finish off. It ate right through to the wood.
    I bought the lacquer today. I'll try it next week. I'm trying to do it on the DL. DH doesn't know I've done this yet. I've been able to keep the spot covered with a placemat.

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    Full Sponsor TapToTalk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MLA View Post
    DH doesn't know I've done this yet. I've been able to keep the spot covered with a placemat.
    With some creativity, you could keep that going for years

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    orange-be-gone MLA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TapToTalk View Post
    With some creativity, you could keep that going for years
    No way! I'm already too stressed out about it as it is. "Oh, honey . . . don't worry about cleaning the table. I'll take care of that. You go play with the kids!"

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