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Thread: Supreme Court sides with family accused of not teaching kids

  1. #1
    Wishes reality was like comic books tpatt100's Avatar
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    Supreme Court sides with family accused of not teaching kids

    Because they are waiting to be raptured. Case was kicked down the lower courts due to a technicality.

    AUSTIN, Texas – The Texas Supreme Court has sided with a family accused of not teaching its children anything while waiting “to be raptured.”

    Laura and Michael McIntyre began homeschooling their nine children inside the family’s El Paso motorcycle dealership more than a decade ago.

    Officials say the family did not have to teach state-approved curriculum or give standardized tests.

    However, problems started when a relative told authorities that he never saw the children reading, working on math, using computers or doing anything educational besides play music.

    He said he heard one of them say that learning wasn’t necessary because “they were going to be raptured.”

    The El Paso school district eventually asked the couple to provide proof that their children were properly educated. The family sued and an appeals court ruled against them.

    The couple argued that school district officials violated their 14th Amendment rights by attempting to verify that their children were learning.


    The case then headed to the state’s Supreme Court, where the justices made a 6-3 ruling on technical grounds in favor of the McIntyres.

    But it didn’t answer larger constitutional questions about whether home-schooled children must be properly taught.

    Justices remanded the case to lower courts, saying its constitutional questions weren’t educational policy matters. But they didn’t issue an opinion on the overall constitutionality
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    Shrieking Violet Sprockey's Avatar
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    I almost posted this yesterday.
    Good luck to those kids...

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    Premier Sponsor mmeblue's Avatar
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    Here's what someone on my homeschooling board said about this decision:

    The recent Texas Supreme Court decision was on an interlocutory appeal, addressing only the question of whether a plaintiff suing a school district is required to first exhaust administrative remedies before the suit can proceed. The Court held that the family didn't have to, because they were claiming that the ISD violated the Texas Constitution, not the education laws, and so the Texas Education Commissioner doesn't have jurisdiction.
    She also provided this link to the decision. So I *think* that the school district was saying that the family needed to go through the Texas Education Commissioner before suing the district, and the Supreme Court said no, the family did NOT need to do that, so the lower court can now proceed with the case.

    Texas homeschooling regulations say that instruction must be bona fide (i.e., not a sham), curriculum must be in visual form (books, workbooks, videos), and curriculum must include five particular subject areas. What those regulations do NOT say is who has the right to verify whether those things are happening. If I understand the case correctly, that's what the lower court needs to determine. So while the family's religious beliefs are what led to the case, the case doesn't actually have anything to do with those beliefs.

    All that aside, I agree with Sprockey on the "good luck to those kids" bit.

  4. #4
    Moderator purplekitty's Avatar
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    Even *if* you believe in the rapture, there is nothing that says it's happening in this lifetime, so why wouldn't people who believe want to educate their children to the best of their ability just in case the rapture doesn't happen? I don't get that.

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    Unrelentingly Oppositional Andrea's Avatar
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    They should educate their kids properly anyway. The angels in heaven don't want to chit chat with uninformed people over cocktails at parties. They really should consider what the afterlife is going to be like for uneducated kids. It's not going to be fun, I can tell you that!

    There's probably jobs up in heaven. They don't want to hire morons up there anymore than we do down here. The parents really should rethink this.

    "When politics becomes a religion, then simple disagreements become apostasies, heresies. And you know what we do with heretics." -- Peggy Noonan


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    Full Sponsor TapToTalk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea View Post
    They should educate their kids properly anyway. The angels in heaven don't want to chit chat with uninformed people over cocktails at parties. They really should consider what the afterlife is going to be like for uneducated kids. It's not going to be fun, I can tell you that!

    There's probably jobs up in heaven. They don't want to hire morons up there anymore than we do down here. The parents really should rethink this.
    Uninformed people? Jobs? Hiring? Chit chat? Sounds like hell.

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    Unrelentingly Oppositional Andrea's Avatar
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    ^ You've got a point!

    "When politics becomes a religion, then simple disagreements become apostasies, heresies. And you know what we do with heretics." -- Peggy Noonan


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    Premier Sponsor Jasmine's Avatar
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    "I am but a stranger here; heaven is my home."
    "Life is about dreams. Teaching is about making them come true."

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    The parents are nutty, to be sure, but it's not the state's job to impose a particular curriculum or insist on standardized tests. Every state has different laws regarding homeschooling, and Texas's laws are very relaxed. Whether or not the kids are learning, I have no idea. I don't think any of my family members have actually *seen* my (homeschooled) kids doing math or whatever, so it's possible that they could have the same claim against me. We're not crazy, though, so that seems to be the difference. If those kids really aren't learning anything, then that's a problem. If they're helping to run the family business, though, they're probably learning quite a bit.

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