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Thread: If your child has SN and/or an IEP

  1. #11
    I would love to be wrong. Yogagirl's Avatar
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    We tossed all of my stepsons stuff well after he got out of high school but it came back to bite us in the ass. When he got into trouble and we were looking for services for him as an adult we couldn't provide anybody with any documentation of his diagnosis or the neuro psych eval he had done. And since it was over 10 years old none of the doctors had retained those records. It probably wouldn't have mattered bu still. And DH has a horrible memory and I wasn't in the picture back then.

  2. #12
    Non-praying member Mamapalooza's Avatar
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    DD was diagnosed at 2 as well, and the clinicians gave me a 3" binder with dividers and various information. I've still used that and added important documents over the years. Her diagnostic paperwork itself is golden, because I can't enrol her in any programs or access funding without it.

    I still have monthly progress reports from her preschool intervention that I can't quite bear to throw out because I like looking at it once in awhile as a reminder of how far we've come. I need that from time to time. I don't keep everything however. I tend to weed out the school stuff on a yearly basis because it gets overwhelming. DH is very careful about keeping all her art and craft projects and he has a big tote for that. I'm sure we'll have that forever.
    "Wherever in the world much poverty is found, much religion is found also"

  3. #13
    Moderator Shaena's Avatar
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    No judgement here, I save the latest IEP's any other diagnostics, but that's it. I do have some early on stuff, and evals, in a file box downstairs, but I stopped saving everything, after a few years.

  4. #14
    still a bibliophile THATJamie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilamomster View Post
    Truth be told, I don't keep any of it anymore. I tried to but found myself drowning. Now we read it, sign it and return it to the school. I don't need it in my house creating more stuff.
    This is me, but we haven't had to fight for any services or diagnostics or anything like that. I might save more if I felt like we kept having to prove shit or something. I keep the current IEP and that's it.

  5. #15
    Who am I again? Lyrehc's Avatar
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    I don't keep a lot either. I've got hard copies of diagnostic evaluations, a copy of his 1st IEP, and a copy of the most recent IEP. I figure that way I cover a span of time, and the in between stuff doesn't matter as much. I've got everything down to a large manila envelope.

  6. #16
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    We have only been doing the IEP thing for 2 years for my 14yo. My 9yo just started with an IEP.

    I take all the papers and convert them to PDF's. - wish everyone would just give me electronic versions but this way everything on my computer is signed too.

    So I have a copy of everything on my computer (and it gets backed up). All of the originals are in a hanging file folder. I have a plastic bin for each kid. Seems to work so far.
    -Chris

  7. #17
    Anyone for tennis? Michelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yogagirl View Post
    We tossed all of my stepsons stuff well after he got out of high school but it came back to bite us in the ass. When he got into trouble and we were looking for services for him as an adult we couldn't provide anybody with any documentation of his diagnosis or the neuro psych eval he had done. And since it was over 10 years old none of the doctors had retained those records. It probably wouldn't have mattered bu still. And DH has a horrible memory and I wasn't in the picture back then.
    Yep, I had one piece of paper that proved my sister went to Special School District in the 1980s. This paper was instrumental in getting her assistance. SSD had some computer glitch years ago and had lost all of her metadata. Without that paper they would not have been willing to spend three days going through archived paper records to find her.

    Those paper records were critical in getting her a caseworker with the Regional Center (who has been help times eleventy), and her current job, which she has had for several years now after two years of unemployment looking on her own. A student of our SSD is qualified for a lifetime of job assistance (coaches, employment help, etc), and help through the Regional Center, Medicaid eval, etc. She almost had none of it.
    Sure, everything we wear smells like barbecue, but you like your shirtwaists triangular, don't you?

  8. #18
    Non-praying member Mamapalooza's Avatar
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    Whenever I've had to produce DD's diagnostic evaluation it had to be the paper original, no exceptions. Which is scary enough, but the facility where she was diagnosed has since closed (been repurposed?) and I might be hard pressed to get another version from the gov't. I've let her paperwork out of my hands when necessary but I'm loathe to do it and then it goes right back into my trusty binder.

    The federal tax agency made me give them a new one last year, and will again in 2019 or something. I took her original papers to a walk-in clinic where a doctor we'd never met before filled out a new one identical to the old one, effectively declaring that she diagnosed DD with a lifelong disability. Her original diagnosis took two intense days with three professionals, not 10 minutes in a waiting room with a stranger. I don't know the point of this charade but it's a joke. So now I have two copies from two different years.
    "Wherever in the world much poverty is found, much religion is found also"

  9. #19
    nolite te bastardes carborundorum stellarfeller's Avatar
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    That's interesting, because a couple of years ago I needed to renew Daniel's DTC form, and we had only just started seeing a new family doctor. She had only seen him a couple of times and didn't know him very well, and was consequently a bit reluctant to complete the form. She preferred that we had a professional who was either more familiar with him, or with autism in general, complete it. I could understand that. So I asked one of the lead researchers in a clinical study that we're enrolled in to complete the form (she's one of the pre-eminent autism researchers in Canada); she had no problem with it, but the government still wanted more information from her!
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  10. #20
    Non-praying member Mamapalooza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stellarfeller View Post
    That's interesting, because a couple of years ago I needed to renew Daniel's DTC form, and we had only just started seeing a new family doctor. She had only seen him a couple of times and didn't know him very well, and was consequently a bit reluctant to complete the form. She preferred that we had a professional who was either more familiar with him, or with autism in general, complete it. I could understand that. So I asked one of the lead researchers in a clinical study that we're enrolled in to complete the form (she's one of the pre-eminent autism researchers in Canada); she had no problem with it, but the government still wanted more information from her!
    I don't get it either. When I looked at the dr's signature area there was no identifying number or anything, and her name was illegible. I could have filled it out myself for all they knew. After I submitted it and got an acknowledgment letter back from CRA, it indicated she would need yet another one in a few years. Crazy when autism is, according to the very form they filled out, defined as a lifelong disability.
    "Wherever in the world much poverty is found, much religion is found also"

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