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Thread: How do I teach my ds his timetables?

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    Member phoenix rising's Avatar
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    How do I teach my ds his timetables?

    This has been an ongoing endeavor since last April. I don't really know how to teach him. I tried doing drills on a chalkboard, flash cards etc.., to no avail. My mother just wrote out the times tables on a paper, up to 12's and sent me into my room till I learned them.

    How did your children learn them, or how are you planning to teach your kids?

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    HI! Wise Old Goat's Avatar
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    I left that to my husband because I'm useless at it. I think he did flashcards. Tbh I still am not sure if ds knows them (he's in grade 8). ETA I just asked him and he said he drew the table for him and then drilled him.

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    Turtle killer STLouisMom9800's Avatar
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    I think a lot of it is just memorization but I did teach my kids some tricks. Like if they didn't know 8x8 but they knew 8x4 then do 8x4 and double it. Or the trick with your hands for the 9's (I always forget what the trick is though LOL).

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    Start with the doubles. Then do the "double-doubles" (x4). Then show him how many of the facts he already knows because he knows those two sets.
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    Full Sponsor TapToTalk's Avatar
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    I made them memorize them, even though the school didn't do it that way. 0 and 1 is easy

    From then on, I didn't move forward until the memorized a number.

    I used flashcards. With DD2, I used some web site for drills. They liked playing on the computer. Probably a zillion fun apps these days.

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    Member phoenix rising's Avatar
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    Yeah, being the techie guy, he's a law us hung hi about he apps and then gets bored.

    JT may you please explain what you mean about doubles? 1x1 2x2 3x3... Is that what you mean? And then what conclusion do I help him draw about the doubles?

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    Premier Sponsor mmeblue's Avatar
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    I wonder if maybe a geometric approach would help him. Maybe try drawing rectangles on graph paper, like a rectangle that's 1 square by 5 squares, then one that's 2 squares by 5 squares, then one that's 3 squares by 5 squares, etc. Seeing how the total number of squares in each rectangle increases might help things "click" for him. You could also try things like asking him to draw rectangles that look different (still rectangles though) but have the same number of squares inside - so 1x12, 2x6, 3x4, and the reverse of each of those would all get you 12 squares inside.

    Also, the game of Yahtzee is a fun way to encourage some understanding of multiplication or at least skip-counting, because knowing those facts helps you determine your best moves. That one would only go up to 6x5, but it could improve his facility with those facts, at least.

    (Please note that my teaching experience is with teenagers and with a kid who's just barely been introduced to multiplication but isn't yet learning the times tables. So I may very well have no idea what I'm talking about. ;))

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    Quote Originally Posted by phoenix rising View Post
    Yeah, being the techie guy, he's a law us hung hi about he apps and then gets bored.

    JT may you please explain what you mean about doubles? 1x1 2x2 3x3... Is that what you mean? And then what conclusion do I help him draw about the doubles?
    Actually, I meant the x2 table. In adding we call them doubles and I've been teaching addition the past few weeks, so I mis-labeled them. If you do the times 2 table, then the times 4s are easy because you just double the 2s.


    ETA I tell my kids, when doing the times 2s, to double the number. That's where I get the hint "double-double" for the 4s.
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    Member phoenix rising's Avatar
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    Thank you for your suggestions. :)

    I've never played Yahtzee and wondered about it and will go buy it and will try the "box thing".

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmeblue View Post
    I wonder if maybe a geometric approach would help him. Maybe try drawing rectangles on graph paper, like a rectangle that's 1 square by 5 squares, then one that's 2 squares by 5 squares, then one that's 3 squares by 5 squares, etc. Seeing how the total number of squares in each rectangle increases might help things "click" for him. You could also try things like asking him to draw rectangles that look different (still rectangles though) but have the same number of squares inside - so 1x12, 2x6, 3x4, and the reverse of each of those would all get you 12 squares inside.
    This is a good strategy too. We cut the grids out of grid paper, glue them to index cards, and make matching games with equations on half the cards and grids on the other half. That's good for if he doesn't really grasp what the process is, but games have value beyond that too because the kids don't notice they are learning.

    multiplication.com has some fun games, but be sure to watch the accuracy scores because some kids like to just hit numbers and not worry about accuracy.
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